Monday, May 25, 2020

No High School Or College Diploma - 956 Words

Having no high school or college diploma, Joesph Bivona, 46, for the past 12 years has owned a Foodtown supermarket in Queens, NY in addition to being one of sixteen owners of the name Foodtown. Joe, 46, was born from poor Italian immigrant parents in Brooklyn, NY. His parents did not push education on him or his brother, who is four years Joe’s senior. As Joe entered into his second year of high school at a private catholic school in Manhattan, Joe’s father realized that school was not for his younger son Joe. Consequently, Joe’s father gave him and his brother $ 50-60,000, which they used to open and run a deli. â€Å"My dad rolled the dice with us. He didn’t have a lot and he gave us everything,† Joe said. Since Joe was now a co-owner of the deli, he dropped out of high school and received his GED, never attending college. â€Å"It was a lot of hours you had to put it, owning a deli. But, I liked working at the deli more than school, I could int eract with people, so the hours really didn’t bother me,† Joe commented. After owning the deli with his brother for three years, Joe decided to take the police officer test. He passed and was planning to attend the police academy. But when his mother discovered his plan, she cried and begged him to get a city job. â€Å"My mother would have been so happy with a city job for me, because it’s secure. But I knew that wasn’t for me,† Joe said. Before owning his Foodtown store in Queens, Joe, around 9-11, owned tow smallShow MoreRelatedShould College Degree Be A High School Diploma?883 Words   |  4 Pagestechnology advancing each day, many jobs in today s society require more than just a high school diploma. Writer Catherine Rampell says, â€Å"A college degree, in other words, is becoming the new high school diploma: the minimum credential required to get even the most basic, entry-level job† (The Washington Post). No matter what college degre e one earns, there will be better opportunities available. Having a college degree helps someone develop confidence, allows someone to become better off economicallyRead MoreShould College Degree Be A High School Diploma?882 Words   |  4 Pagestechnology advancing each day, many jobs in todays society require more than just a high school diploma. Writer Catherine Rampell says, â€Å"A college degree, in other words, is becoming the new high school diploma: the minimum credential required to get even the most basic, entry-level job† (The Washington Post). No matter what college degree one earns, there will be better opportunities available. Having a college degree helps someone develop confidence, allows someone to become better off economicallyRead MoreCollege Degree Vs High School Diploma1142 Words   |  5 PagesCollege Degree vs High School Diploma Do we really need a college degree to be a successful human? Is a high school diploma good enough to live a great life? Does working at a fast food franchise such as Mcdonald s appeal to you? Do you want to work a nine dollar wage job for the rest of your life? Working a nine hour job, whereas you can be earning forty dollars an hour seem fair? I strongly consider that having a college degree is well accepted and needed to be a successful person in todaysRead MoreGetting The Facts : College Degree Vs. High School Diploma919 Words   |  4 PagesGetting the Facts: College Degree vs. High School Diploma--Learn the Top 5 Benefits of Going to College Many high school students, and perhaps their parents, often wrestle with the question: Does a person with a college degree make more money than one with just a high school diploma? Can I earn more money with a college degree or by going straight to work after high school? Is it worthwhile to go to college? Research shows that yes, those who have a college education usually do make more than thoseRead MoreThe Relation Between Education and the Quality of Life1263 Words   |  6 PagesDan Rather once held the assumption that â€Å"A college degree is the key to realizing the American dream, well worth the financial sacrifice because it is supposed to open the door to a world of opportunity† (Dan Rather Quote). With today’s rough economic conditions, social mobility and the quality of life are controversial topics that have many different theories. Some people believe that increasing social mobility can be done in a variety of different ways, while others think achieving this mobilityRead MoreMinimum Educational Requirements Meter Reading Jobs958 Words   |  4 Pages Most meter reader jobs require a high school diploma and a valid driver’s license. Many people start utility careers in this occupation with the goal of advancing to positions with more responsibility. Even though the wage of meter readers was $30.00 per hour, it is still lack of meter readers. Sam McCord, who is the human resource director of the company, suggested changing the education requirement for the meter reader job from high school diploma to college degree. However Judy disagreed withRead More College: A Gateway to Success in America Essay1001 Words   |  5 PagesBeginning a college education as soon as one graduates high school is a great way to jump start your life and is a beginner’s step to becoming financially secure. High School is a great tool to help prepare someone for a higher education. As a former high school student, I now realize I was handed all the tools to succeed in college, but I could not leave the social aspect of school and focus on my studies. Many of Americas’ high school struggle to achieve their high school diploma and this oneRead MorePersonal Experience: Dropping Out of School Changed my Life688 Words   |  3 Pageswould have not dropped out of school and later gotten my GED. I made this decision at a young age, unaware of how this decision would change my future greatly. In deciding to drop out of school, I missed out on the experience that high school gives you and how it would have helped develop my character. If I stayed enrolled in school I would have had more doors opened for my future and the assistance that I would have needed to make those life choices such as college. I would have been able to feelRead MoreCollege Education Is All This Really Worth It?85 0 Words   |  4 Pagesseven years in college, with that magic piece of paper clutched triumphantly in my fist, the best job I was able to get was night watchman on a sewer project in Babylon, N.Y. guarding a hole in the ground to prevent anyone from stealing it. God bless the American educational system!† ― Spider Robinson (GoodReads.com). While many are excited about starting college and beginning a new chapter in their lives, too often the college freshman wonders â€Å"Is all this really worth it?†. Is a college educationRead MoreA Brief Note On Social Class And Education847 Words   |  4 Pagessuccess and wealth in society. Earning a college degree and learning skills will have a chance to higher income and lower unemployment rate and poverty level in this society. However, higher education requires a good financial state. College cost has risen. High tuition fee gives an unequal opportunities to every student, even though the college degree give opport unities to chance overcoming poverty. children in a rich family have more chance to get high education and the education drive to success

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Violence - Problem in Our Society - Free Essay Example

Sample details Pages: 2 Words: 603 Downloads: 10 Date added: 2019/03/20 Category Society Essay Level High school Tags: Gun Violence Essay Did you like this example? What a breezy day! Olivia thought as she skipped along the sidewalk holding on to her fathers hand. Acknowledging his every move, she thought, Daddy is so handsome; I kind of look like him! As Oliva and her family finished up their afternoon walk around their neighborhood, talks about going to the movies got Oliva and her three siblings excited. Hurrying to get home, they noticed Sergio the neighbor had stormed out of his house yelling; in his hand, he carried a gun! Fear and panic filled Olivias little heart. Don’t waste time! Our writers will create an original "Violence Problem in Our Society" essay for you Create order Run, run, daddy lets run home! were the last words Olivia said as Sergio fatally shot her and her handsome daddy. This unfortunate and dreadful story is as real as night and day. According to NBC News, Olivia Stoffel and her father were victims of a rage disorder. Army veteran Sergio Valencia del Toro, after a fight with his girlfriend, shot a stranger and turned his gun on the Stoffels (NBC News). After extensive research on the shooters background history, police discovered that Sergio had an extensive history of psychiatric problems and suicide treats, a drinking problem and yet with his condition, he owned a .9mm semiautomatic pistol and eight more other guns at home, which he bought, because he had no criminal record. A gun at home makes homicide three times more likely, suicide up to five times as likely, and accidental death four times higher than a non-gun owning homes, according to Childrens Defense. As a constitutional right to own guns, when will the government draw the line, with gun owners who have a clean criminal record but have a mental illness? When will parent who own guns, learn that it is imperative to have full control of access where children cannot find them? Gun violence has become a developing problem in our society. W e hear about mass shootings at schools, children killing children as an outrage of anger, and women being victims of domestic violence and murdered by their domestic partners. How do these individuals gain access to these weapons? As the law states that we do have the right to bear arms but does this law favor society as whole? Is owing a gun, because the second amendment states we can, mandatory? Guns should not be put in the wrong hands of the wrong individuals. Guns need to be locked away in safes where only the owner can access it. New gun control laws need to be created to give our future generations an opportunity to live in a violence free world. But, why do people feel that they need to own a gun? According to the Gallup poll from 2005, protection is the main reason why people own guns. This is rather a very controversially point, granted there are many alternatives for a person to protect themselves. I am strong believer that families who have children should never own a gun, in fact, should seek alternative protective measures. As a parent, I have always questioned whether my home should be a place where a gun resides or are there alternatives for my familys protection. After further research, I have come across alternatives that till this day are worth more to me than buying a gun. Placing our home under surveillance will not always guarantee protection, but according to the Ad council 3 out of 5 burglars will seek an alternative ta rget if there is an alarm or home security system onsite, such as guard dogs. Although I favor gun control, if I have the opportunity to change the laws about families owning guns, I would incline to a gun free home.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

The Right Of Freedom Speech - 1186 Words

The right to freedom speech is one of the many great reasons America is one of if not the best country on this planet. America for ages has been a home for all and place where anyone can be themselves. However, what happens when these rights are tampered with and questioned? What happens when freedom of speech is no longer a guaranteed right? The supreme court case Island Trees School District v Pico dealt with a scenario where this right was essentially dissected. The Island Trees School District board made the claim that specific books amidst the school library were promoting anti american, anti-christian, anti-semitic, and just plain filthy ideological constructs. Dealing with a case such as this can be a rather tough decision. Each†¦show more content†¦The book was believed by some to written based on a true story but whether that is true or not remains unknown. Regardless, the book seemed rather inappropriate to be within a school library. (Go Ask) Black Boy was a book about the struggles of a dysfunctional â€Å"black boys† life. The books name was probably enough to get it on the list in the first place but the concept behind the writing didn’t seem to great either. (Black Boy) Finally, the book A Hero Ain’t Worth Nothin but a Sandwich, was written about a ghetto boy who became addicted to cigarettes. (A hero ain’t) These were only some of the books listed but regardless the argument for the removal of these books becomes quite relevant. These books appear to be unnecessary and probably unwanted in a school environment but removing the books is, at least to some, a direct attack against our first amendment. (Richardson) Soon after the school the had removed the books the opposing side along with the backlash hit back. However, despite recommendation from the committees and superintendents, the board refused to acknowledge the opposing side and officially followed through with banning 2 of the 11 books. The boards clai med soon after in a press conference that is was their â€Å"civil duty† to protect their students within their school from this â€Å"moral danger.† AShow MoreRelatedSpeech Is The Right Of Freedom Of Speech1560 Words   |  7 PagesIf freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. This mentality still holds true in the United States today where the freedom of speech is held as one of the greatest rights Americans possess. However, to fully understand the first Amendment right of freedom of speech it is paramount to understand what it entails, its limitations, and how it has evolved over time. The first question that must be answered is what is the constitutional right ofRead MoreThe Rights Of Freedom Of Speech1231 Words   |  5 Pagespress were in essence â€Å"the eyes and ears of the people.† Freedom of the press is the irrefutable privilege to propagate opinions in print without censorship by the government. Americans enjoy freedom of the press under the First Amendment to the Constitution, which states: â€Å"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition theRead MoreFreedom Of Speech By The Bill Of Rights Essay1340 Words   |  6 Pagescontroversial topic that many protested for was, freedom of speech. After many years of wanting to be heard, Americans finally achieved the assurance of having a voice. The Bill of Rights was passed on December 15, 1791; commencing with the Firs t Amendment. The First Amendments defends freedom of speech, press, religion, assembly and petition. Stated in the U.S. Constitution, the First Amendment declares Congress shall make no law†¦ abridging the freedom of speech.† Thus, meaning that citizens cannot be imposedRead MoreFreedom Of Speech : Bill Of Rights851 Words   |  4 PagesBill of Rights in the First Amendment the following: â€Å"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble and to petition the government for a redress of grievances† (Bill of Rights - Bill of Rights Institute. Bill of Rights Institute). How do these â€Å"Clauses† protect us within the First Amendment? Do we really have â€Å"freedom of speech†? LetRead MoreThe Freedom Of Speech By The Bill Of Rights1569 Words   |  7 Pagesbill of rights was created to give people the fundamentally important individual freedoms that no law could limit or take away. The quote from In Our Defense Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press greater emphasis how vital it was to make freedom of speech the main priority for the people of this nation. However, many of the stuff the people express when using this right had causedRead MoreFreedom Of Speech And Moral Rights2018 Words   |  9 Pagesgenerated controversy concerning the extent of freedom of speech and moral rights. The cultural diversity has provided a basis to crossover the cultural, racial, and even gender boundaries that have allowed a sense of equality in society. In hindsight, this front has promoted the decline in moral obligations leading to inaccurate accounts of cultural diversity in the interest of generate societal appraisal. Therefore, freedom of speech and moral rights has become intertwined at a time when they shouldRead MoreHuman Rights And Freedom Of Speech1932 Words   |  8 Pagesshall enjoy freedom of speech and belief and freedom from fear† and that â€Å"to rebel against tyranny and oppression†¦is protected by the rule of law.† We, as people of the free world, are guaranteed our inalienable rights and these fundamental rights can only be taken away by due process (The Universal Declaration†¦). As one of the world’s emerging superpowers, the People’s Republic of China holds a long history of impeding human rights for the â€Å"health of social stability† (Human Rights in†¦). China isRead MoreThe Freedom Of Speech By The Bill Of Rights977 Words   |  4 Pageswhat the ones mainly pertaining to criminal justice actually meant. The First, Fourth, Fifth,Sixth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendment all provide a foundation for our criminal justice system. There are also many particular protect ions in The Bill of Rights. The First Amendment has many different clauses that make it up and I would say that it is the most important out of the Amendments in regards to the criminal justice system. First of all, the Establishment Clause ensures the individuals from theRead MoreThe Freedom Of Speech And Democratic Rights1637 Words   |  7 Pagescitizens to enjoy the rights, responsibilities and equity the country has to offer. Many nations across the world have some type of citizenship model which allows the individuals of a country to enact their political and legal rights destined to them from birth simply because they are human beings and citizens of such countries. Political and legal rights are protected and known as first generation negative rights; they include the rights fundamental to political and legal freedoms. They include politicalRead MoreFreedom Of Speech And The Right For Privacy1791 Words   |  8 Pagessuch a gargantuan number of unique, global users (some of whom use the WWW more mali ciously than others), comes a number of ethical controversies. The World Wide Web has been fraught with debate, particularly concerning the clash between freedom of speech and the right for privacy and security. This paper will discuss this issue, focusing on the users of the WWW, those that control access, and those that use the information uploaded to the World Wide Web. People around the globe use the World Wide Web

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Enduring Love Essay Example For Students

Enduring Love Essay Science writer Joe Rose is spending a day in the country with his long-time lover, Clarissa, when he witnesses a tragic accidenta balloon with a boy trapped in it is being tossed by the wind, and, in an attempt to save the child, a man is killed. As though that isnt disturbing enough, a man named Jed Parry, who has joined Rose in helping to bring the balloon to safety, believes that something has passed between him and Rosesomething that sparks in Parry a deranged, obsessive kind of love. Soon Parry is stalking Rose, who turns to science to try to understand the situation. Parry apparently suffers from a condition known to psychiatrists as de Clerambault Syndrome, in which the afflicted individual obsessively pursues the object of his desire until the frustrated love turns to hate and ragetransforming one of lifes most valued experiences into pathological horror. As Rose grows more paranoid and terrified, as his treasured relationship with Clarissa breaks under the tension of his fear, Rose realizes that he needs to find something beyond the cold reasoning of science if this love is to be endured. With the cool brilliance and deep compassion that defined his best novels (The Comfort of Strangers, The Innocent), Ian McEwan has once again spun a tale of life intruded upon by shocks of violence-and discovered profound truths about the nature of love and the power of forgiveness.Bibliography:

Saturday, April 11, 2020

The Photographic Conditions of Surrealism Essay Example For Students

The Photographic Conditions of Surrealism Essay I open my subject with a comparison. On the one hand, there is Man Ray s Monument to de Sade, a photograph made in 1933 for the magazine Le Surreal isme au sendee de la resolution. On the other, there is a self-portrait by Florence Henri, given wide exposure by its appearance in the 1929 Foto-Auge. a publica tion that catalogued the European avant-gardes position with regard to photogra phy.1 This comparison involves, then, a slight adulteration of my subject surrealism—by introducing an image deeply associated with the Bauhaus. For Florence Henri had been a student of Moholy-Nagy, although at the time of Foto Auge she had returned to Paris. Of course the purity of Foto-Auges statement had already been adulterated by the presence within its covers of certain surrealist associates, like Man Ray, Maurice Tabard, and E. Ð ¢. I. Mesens. But by and large Foto-Auge is dominated by German material and can be conceived of as organiz ing a Bauhaus view of photography, a view that we n ow think of as structured by the Vorkorss obsession with form. Indeed, one way of eavesdropping on a Bauhaus-derived experience of this photograph is to read its analysis from the introduction to a recent reprint xrtfolio of Henris work. Remarking that she is known almost exclusively through this self-portrait, the writer continues. Its concentration and structure are so perfect that its quintessence is at once apparent. The forceful impression it produces derives principally from the subject’s intense gaze at her own reflection. . . . We will write a custom essay on The Photographic Conditions of Surrealism specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now Her gaze passes   dispassionately through the mirror and is returned—parallel to the lines made by the joints in the table. . . . The balls—normally symbols of movement—here strengthen the impression of stillness and undis turbed contemplation. . . . They have been assigned a position at the vertex of the picture. . . their exact position at the same time lends stability to the structure and provides the dominant element of the human reflec tion with the necessary contrast.2 In light of the writers determination to straightjacket this image within the limits of an abstracting, mechanically formalist discourse, the strategy behind a juxtaM)sition of Man Rays photograph with Florence Henri’s becomes apparent. Because the comparison forces attention away from the contents of the Henri whether those contents arc conceived of as psychological (the intense gaze† and its dispassionate stare) or as formal (the establishment of stillness through structural stability, etc.). And being turned from the photograph’s contents, one’s attention is relocated on the container—on what could be called the character of the frame as sign or emblem. For the Henri and the Man Ray share the same recourse to the definition of a photographic subject through the act of framing it, even as they share the same enframing shape. In both cases one is treated to the capture of the photographic subject by the frame, and in both, this capture has a sexual import. In the Man Ray the act of rotation, which transmutes the sign of the cross into the figure of the phallus, juxtaposes an emblem of the Sadean act of sacrilege with an image of the object of its sexual pleasure. And two further aspects of this image bespeak the structural reciprocity between frame and image, container and contained. 1he lighting of the buttocks and thighs of the subject is such that physical density drains off the body as it moves from the center of the image, so that by the time ones gaze approaches the margins, flesh has become so generalized and flattened as to be assimilated to printed page. Given this threat of dissipation of physical substance, the frame is experienced as shoring up the collapsing structure of corporeality and guaranteeing its density by the rather conceptual gesture of drawing limits, lliis sense of the structural intervention of frame inside contents is further deepened by the morphological consonance—what we could call the visual rhyming—between shape of frame and shape of figure: for the linear intersections set up by the clefts and folds in the photographed anatomy mimic the master sha|e of the frame. Never could the object of violation have been depicted as more willing. In Florence Henris self-portrait there is a similar play between flatness and fullness, as there is a parallel sense of the phallic frame as both maker and captor of the sitters image. Within the spell of this comparison, the chromed balls function to project the experience of phallidsm into the center of the image, setting up (as in the Man Ray) a system of reiteration and echo; and this seems far more imperatively their role than that of promoting the formal values of stillness and balance. .u1a562f172ce57590118adae713afbc17 , .u1a562f172ce57590118adae713afbc17 .postImageUrl , .u1a562f172ce57590118adae713afbc17 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u1a562f172ce57590118adae713afbc17 , .u1a562f172ce57590118adae713afbc17:hover , .u1a562f172ce57590118adae713afbc17:visited , .u1a562f172ce57590118adae713afbc17:active { border:0!important; } .u1a562f172ce57590118adae713afbc17 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u1a562f172ce57590118adae713afbc17 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u1a562f172ce57590118adae713afbc17:active , .u1a562f172ce57590118adae713afbc17:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u1a562f172ce57590118adae713afbc17 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u1a562f172ce57590118adae713afbc17 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u1a562f172ce57590118adae713afbc17 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u1a562f172ce57590118adae713afbc17 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u1a562f172ce57590118adae713afbc17:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u1a562f172ce57590118adae713afbc17 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u1a562f172ce57590118adae713afbc17 .u1a562f172ce57590118adae713afbc17-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u1a562f172ce57590118adae713afbc17:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: A History of Portraiture EssayIt can. of course, be objected that ibis comparison is tendentious. That it is a false analogy. That it suggests some kind of relationship between these two artists that cannot be there since they operate from across the rift that separates two aesthetic positions: Man Ray being a surrealist and Florence Henri being commit ted to an ideology of formal rigor and abstraction received initially from I.egcr and then from the Bauhaus. It can be argued that if there is a kind of phallicism in Henris portrait, it is there inadvertently; she could not really have intended it. As art history becomes increasingly positivist, it holds more and more to th e view that intention is some internal, prior mental event causally connec ted with outward effects, which remain lire evidence for its having occurred, and thus, to say that works of art are intentional objects is to say that each bit of them is separately intended.5 Bui, sharing neither this positivism nor this view of consciousness. I have no scruples in using the comparative method   wrest this image from the protective hold of Miss Henris intention and to open it, by analogy, to a whole range of production that was taking place at the same time and in the same locale. Yet with these two images I do not mean to introduce an exercise in comparative iconography. As I said, the area of interest is far less in the contents of these photographs than it is in their frame. Which is to say that if there is any question of phallicisin here, it is to Ire found within the whole photographic enterprise of framing and thereby capturing a subject. Its conditions can be generalized way beyond the specifics of sexual imagery to a structural logic that subsumes this particular image and accounts for a wide number of decisions made by photographers of this time, both with regard to subject and to form. The name that an entirely different field of critical theory gives to this structural logic is the economy of the supplement.* And what I intend to reveal in the relatedness of photographic practice in France and Germany in the 1920s and 30s is a shared conception of photography as defined by the supplement. But I am getting ahead of my argument. My reason at the outset for introducing my subject by means of comparison is that I wish to invoke the comparative method as such, the comparative method as it was introduced into art-historical practice in order to focus on a wholly different object than that of intention. The comparative method was fashioned to net the illusive historical beast called style, a prey which, because it was transpersonal, was understood as being quite beyond the claims of either individual authorship or intention. This is why Wolfflin believed the lair of style to be the decorative arts rather than the domain of masterpieces, why he looked for it Morelli-fashion in those areas that would Ire the product of inattention, a lack of specific design† going so far as to claim that the whole development of world views was to be found in the history of the relationship of gables. Now it is precisely style that continues to Ire a vexing problem for anyone dealing with surrealist art. Commenting on the formal heterogeneity of a movement that could encompass the abstract liquifaction of Mir6 on the one hand, and the d ry tealism of Magritte oi Dali on the other. William Rubin addresses this problem of style, declaring that we cannot formulate a definition of Surrealist painting comparable in clarity with the meanings of Impressionism and Cubism. †Yet as a scholar who has to think his way into and around the mass of material that is said to be surrealist. Rubin feels in need of what he calls an intrinsic definition of Surrealist painting. And so he produces what he claims to be the first such definition ever proposed.† His definition is that there arc two poles of surrealist endeavor—the automatisi/abstract and the aca demic/illusionist—the two poles corresponding to the Freudian twin props of Surrealist theory, namely automatism (or free association) and dreams. Although these two pictorial modes look very unlike indeed. Rubin continues, they can be united around the concept of the irrationally conceived metaphoric image. Now, in 1925 Andre* Breton began to examine the subject surrealism and painting, and from the outset he characterized his material in terms of the very twin poles—automatism and dream—and the subject matter of Rubins later definition.6 If forty years afterward Rubin w as so unhappy with Breton’s attempt at a synthetic statement that he had to claim to have produced the first such definition ever, it is undoubtedly because Rubin, like everyone else, has been unconvinced that Bretons was a definition in the first place. If one wishes to produce a synthesis between A and B. it is not enough simply to say. A plus B.† A synthesis is rather different from a list. And it has long been apparent that a catalogue of subject matter held in common is neither necessary nor sufficient to produce the kind of coherence one is referring to by the notion of style. If Rubin’s nondefinition is a mirror-image of Bretons earlier one, this relationship is important, because it locates Bretons own theory as a source for the problem confronting all subsequent discussions. But Breton, as the most central spokesman for surrealism, is an obstacle one must surmount; one cannot avoid him, if the issue is to deal with the movement comprehensivelyas one must if a synthetic notion like style is involved. The same failure to think the formal heterogeneity of Miro and Magritte into something like stylistic unity plagues every effort of Breton as theoretician of the movement. Attempting to define surrealism, Breton produces instead a series of contradictions which, like the one between the linearity of Magritte and the colorism of Miro, strike one as being irreducible. .ua82c2ac67806e506eee4be38d7a311aa , .ua82c2ac67806e506eee4be38d7a311aa .postImageUrl , .ua82c2ac67806e506eee4be38d7a311aa .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .ua82c2ac67806e506eee4be38d7a311aa , .ua82c2ac67806e506eee4be38d7a311aa:hover , .ua82c2ac67806e506eee4be38d7a311aa:visited , .ua82c2ac67806e506eee4be38d7a311aa:active { border:0!important; } .ua82c2ac67806e506eee4be38d7a311aa .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .ua82c2ac67806e506eee4be38d7a311aa { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .ua82c2ac67806e506eee4be38d7a311aa:active , .ua82c2ac67806e506eee4be38d7a311aa:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .ua82c2ac67806e506eee4be38d7a311aa .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .ua82c2ac67806e506eee4be38d7a311aa .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .ua82c2ac67806e506eee4be38d7a311aa .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .ua82c2ac67806e506eee4be38d7a311aa .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .ua82c2ac67806e506eee4be38d7a311aa:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .ua82c2ac67806e506eee4be38d7a311aa .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .ua82c2ac67806e506eee4be38d7a311aa .ua82c2ac67806e506eee4be38d7a311aa-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .ua82c2ac67806e506eee4be38d7a311aa:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Alfred Stieglitz Biography EssayThus, Breton introduces Surrealism and Painting† with a declaration of the absolute value of vision among the sensory modes. Rejecting the late nineteenth-century die turn, that all art should aspire to the condition of music, an idea very much alive among twentieth-century abstract artists, Breton insists that visual images attain what music never can, and he bids this great medium farewell with the words, â€Å"so may night continue to descend upon the orchestra.† His hymn of praise to vision had begun, The eye exists in its savage state. Tire marvels of the earth . . . have as their sole witness the wild eye that traces all i ts colors back to the rainbow.† And by this statement he is contrasting the immcdi Ð °Ã' Ã'Æ' of vision—its perceptual automatism, as it were—to the premeditated, reflective gait of thought. The savageness of vision is good. pure, uncontaminatcd by ratiocination; the calculations of reason (which Breton never fails to call bourgeois reason†) are controlling, degenerate, bad. Besides being untainted by reason, visions primacy results from the way its objects are present to it, through an immediacy and transparency that compels belief. Indeed, Breton often presents surreal isin-as-a-whole as defined by visuality. In the First Manifesto he locates the very invention of psychic automatism within the experience of hypnogogic images—that is. of half-waking, half-dreaming,visual experience.

Tuesday, March 10, 2020

The Causes Road Rage in Australia.

The Causes Road Rage in Australia. Stress is an inevitable part of life and unfortunately, is a major cause of road rage. Driver stress is usually brought upon in increasing traffic congestion, particularly if they are late for an appointment, have been on the road for a prolonged amount of time or even when competing for a parking space. Stress often leads to other feelings such as, anger, frustration and fear, which may also subsequently create tendencies towards impatience and intolerance amongst drivers. Environmental factors such as weather conditions and poor lighting can also influence road rage as it increases the chances of road accidents.It is quite obvious that accidents on the road will often set off road rage. Most incidents of road rage are usually attributed to mistakes or misunderstandings of others, possibly due to intolerance of others or the neglect of the road rules. Experts point out that road rage is often the result of poor, careless or unsafe driving.Roadrage 2003Behaviours such as, not using i ndicators, driving too slowly, changing lanes, cutting drivers off, or blocking on purpose can regularly lead to road rage, especially if drivers are under stress. Victims of road rage are likely to insult their offenders mainly due to inexperienced driving or behaviours of poor conduct.Some psychologists have reported that road hostility can be due to dysfunctional behaviour. Offenders of road rage tend to be aggressive by temperament and become easily frustrated, especially if stressed or fatigued. They become less tolerant and are unable to control their own impulses. As a result, many offenders are prone to use violence as a solution and will have used violence in previous situations. Even slight damage or threat to their vehicle can infuriate them and set off a road rage incident. Many people feel that being inside a car makes them...

Saturday, February 22, 2020

Philosophy Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words - 23

Philosophy - Essay Example These tactics forced the slaves to adopt survival tactics of living, reinforcing the beliefs of white people that menial labor was all the slaves were capable of – higher thought was clearly beyond the capacity of their more primitive brains. Making the situation even worse, this societal attitude was successful in convincing many of the slaves that these assumptions were correct. Proving that this was not the case, though, was Frederick Douglass. An escaped slave from Maryland, he was the first black man to appear on a presidential ticket in America. Douglass told the world his story revealing in the process how literacy changed him deeply to transform him from a masterless slave to a freethinking human being. These ideas are also revealed in his early narrative Frederick Douglass: Life of an American Slave. Although his exact birth date is unknown, Douglass believed he was born sometime in February of 1818. He died on February 20, 1895. Today’s common perception is that slavery, at least the brutal form of it, was confined mostly in the south on the big plantations yet Douglass witnessed many brutal beatings on his master’s Maryland farm where he lived for his first seven years. As a child, he was often required to endure cold and hunger because the master kept most of the slave-generated products, including food and fuel, for his own comfort and well-being. Normally a very traumatic event for a child, when 7-year-old Douglass’ mother died, he felt almost no grief. â€Å"Never having enjoyed, to any considerable extent, her soothing presence, her tender and watchful care, I received the tidings of [my mother’s] death with much the same emotions I should have probably felt at the death of a stranger† (Ch. 1). The important lesson Douglass tries to conv ey in these early chapters is how the slave is created from birth. He is separated from his family to destroy any natural human feelings of